Cattle depicted in cave drawings estimated to be 20,000 years old in the Lascaux Cave near Montignac, France, have a striking resemblance to today's Limousin animals.   Limousin cattle evolved into a breed with remarkable sturdiness, health and adaptability
Cattle depicted in cave drawings estimated to be 20,000 years old in the Lascaux Cave near Montignac, France, have a striking resemblance to today's Limousin animals.   Limousin cattle evolved into a breed with remarkable sturdiness, health and adaptability.
     
Limousin cattle are renowned for their ability to flourish and grow while grazing on grasslands.   Limousin cattle are renowned for their ability to flourish and grow while grazing on grasslands.
Limousin cattle are renowned for their ability to flourish
and grow while grazing on grasslands.
     
Randy and Tim Strauss, pose with NALF board of directors after signing a historic exclusive partnership in January 2008. Strauss Brands worked with NALF members to bring to market the exclusive Free Raised and Meadow Reserve veal programs.
Randy and Tim Strauss, pose with NALF board of directors after signing a historic exclusive partnership in January 2008.  Strauss Brands worked with NALF members to bring to market the exclusive Free Raised and Meadow Reserve veal programs.

History of the Limousin Breed

The history of Limousin cattle might very well be as old as the European continent itself. Cattle depicted in cave drawings estimated to be 20,000 years old in the Lascaux Cave near Montignac, France, have a striking resemblance to today's Limousin animals.

The breed is native to the old provinces of Limousin and Marche in central France. The terrain there is rugged and rolling, with rocky soil and a harsh climate.

Throughout the ages, Limousin cattle spent their time outdoors, roaming central France’s lush, yet sometimes harsh, grasslands. As a result of their environment, Limousin cattle evolved into a breed with remarkable sturdiness, health and adaptability. Limousin cattle are renowned for their ability to flourish and grow while grazing on grasslands. They are known to be medium-sized and very lean cattle. These traits are still important today.

Cattle from France were not eligible for importation into the United States until the early 1970s. Therefore, the first Limousin bull imported permanently into the United States, Kansas Colonel, did not arrive until 1971. A Kansas producer, Bob Haag, was the first U.S. cattleman to introduce a Limousin bull onto his ranch.

As the first Limousin cattle arrived in North America, producers realized the need for an organization to promote and develop it in the United States. Soon, they formed the North American Limousin Foundation (NALF). Today, NALF has nearly 4,000 active members throughout the United States.

In January 2008, Strauss Brands and NALF entered into a historic partnership. Working together, they are supporting both Limousin producers and consumers alike by producing veal according to authentic, old-world, pasture-raising traditions for Strauss Free Raised veal.

 
North American Limousin Foundation
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